Lasiommata megera

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WALL Lasiommata megera

The catastrophic decline in Cheshire and South Lancashire is clear from the maps. The maps appear to show an increase in West Lancahire (VC60); however I would regard this with suspicion and suggest that the relative sparsity of records in this vice-county during the first period is entirely due to inadequate recording.

R.L.H. Dennis, in A resource-based habitat view for conservation:Butterflies in the British landscape (2010), concluded, treating the SD grid squares as the "north region" and the SJ squares as the "south region", that "First, the butterfly was far more abundant on low ground than on high ground during the first period. Second, numbers of the butterfly drop, often dramatically, in later periods at all elevations except on high ground [which he defines as land over 150 m in altitude] where they increase (north region) and stabilise (latterly north and south region).The bias for higher elevations in the southern region suggests a degree of stasis in upland areas, but certainly of smaller losses inupland than in lowland areas of the Cheshire Plain. This is manifestly an upland refuge effect, a geographical bias in different survival rates."

THE THREE PERIODS COMPARED

PERIOD 1 (1940-1994) WITH RECORDING COVERAGE, ALTITUDE AND URBAN COVER

PERIOD 2 (1995-2000) WITH RECORDING COVERAGE, ALTITUDE AND URBAN COVER

PERIOD 3 (2001-2007) WITH RECORDING COVERAGE, ALTITUDE AND URBAN COVER

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